Rathna Nagaraj

Abstract

3  

Rathna Nagaraj

Abstract

Eco’s Of The Past

Eco’s Of The Past

3 mins
183


In the year 1980, I had passed my tenth standard. It was a matter of pride within my joint family, and I felt quite accomplished. Additionally, I had joined a typing institute, which was also a thrilling development in my family due to their uneducated background. Undoubtedly, attending the typing institution filled me with pride, and it also piqued the curiosity of my neighbors. I carried myself with a sense of importance, believing that I was privileged and more intelligent than my cousins who lived in the same house.


As days went by, I attended the typing institute located just next to my house, on the first floor above the shops. The owner, who doubled as a tutor, would observe all our actions. He had a view in an L-shape, encompassing both the main road on one side and our economy row houses on the other. Unfortunately, he held a low opinion of my progress as a student. As someone who was easily frightened, I struggled to grasp the typing techniques and manuscripts. My beginner's nerves led me to type letters with crossed margins, which earned me scolding. I also made the mistake of drawing slanted margins due to fear while using a ruler, which resulted in further reprimanding.


These errors piled up, and the tutor, Thomas, began to dislike me. His demeanor filled me with panic day and night. Consequently, I decided to stop attending typing classes. However, my mother consoled me, stating that it was shameful to give up. Her words persuaded me to continue the typing classes. Despite this, I ended up failing my junior English exam, which heightened my stress. People then advised me to join another reputable typing institute known for its excellent coaching.


This new institute was called Rajan Institute of Typing. The owner and tutor, Rajan, had a robust physique, a dark complexion, bloodshot eyes, and a somewhat intimidating appearance. He was known to be extremely strict. If he spotted any students, boys, or girls socializing, he would admonish them, emphasizing that they were there to learn, not to engage in romantic affairs. He would even inform the parents in such cases. Rajan maintained a policy of punctuality, forbidding students from arriving too early or loitering around after class. He demanded regular attendance and accurate typing, and any deviation would result in immediate expulsion from the institute. His strict demeanor frightened everyone, and students dreaded his weekly review classes and tests. Passing these classes was a relief for all, including me. In my desperation to avoid the review class, I had made a superstitious gesture, but it led to a mistake in my typing.


Rajan was stern, but he had a good heart. His strictness was intended to ensure our improvement. I managed to pass both junior and senior typing courses. I was appointed as a typing instructor for the morning batch, earning Rs. 50/-, and later for the evening session, bringing my total pay to Rs. 100/-. Remarkably, I received this job offer without even applying for it. I am grateful to Rajan sir for his encouragement and support.


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