Participate in the 3rd Season of STORYMIRROR SCHOOLS WRITING COMPETITION - the BIGGEST Writing Competition in India for School Students & Teachers and win a 2N/3D holiday trip from Club Mahindra
Participate in the 3rd Season of STORYMIRROR SCHOOLS WRITING COMPETITION - the BIGGEST Writing Competition in India for School Students & Teachers and win a 2N/3D holiday trip from Club Mahindra

Aashwath Acharya

Abstract Tragedy


5.0  

Aashwath Acharya

Abstract Tragedy


Little Wings

Little Wings

2 mins 465 2 mins 465

I knew it was a bird crying out for help. I followed the source of the sound to the back of my society's compound, where the banyan tree stood, and sure enough, it was a bird. A little myna, trying to spread its wings for the first time. It was barely able to stand up either. I looked up at the tree and could vaguely make out a nest and two other shadows hopping from one branch to the other: the myna's parents. Their chick was calling out to them but they stayed perched on the tree. They wanted their little one to spread its wings and fly up to them. It just needs a little nudge, I thought.

I ran to the gate calling out to Dharamsingh, our watchman. "Uncle, we need to help a myna bird fly", I said, "It isn't able to jump so maybe if you could lift it up in the air it can learn to fly."

But Dharamsingh made me wait for him to finish up his beedi before replying nonchalantly, "Listen son, don't interfere. It should learn on it's own, like all birds do. You won't be helping it if you try to help it. You might end up killing it."

I was speechless. I opened my mouth and promptly closed it. I tried to say something again but he was already sucking on another beedi. At least he'll die sooner than the bird, and seeking satisfaction from that thought I returned to help the bird reach its parents.

The myna was now shrieking loudly, and so were it's parents. I had to act soon. I picked the bird up gently with both hands, but it protested vehemently. It seemed to relax when I stroked it's neck. It's parents stayed silent.

The compound wall was high enough for bird to jump and take flight. So I placed it atop the wall. The myna sat there silently, it's eyes transfixed on me. "You're welcome. Now take off", I exclaimed.

Suddenly, myna's parents began to shriek loudly. I saw a flash of a brown jump from the other side of the compound wall, grab the little myna by the neck and disappear. The myna was nowhere to be seen. Just a few drops of blood where I had kept it.

I heard a jubilant voice behind me say, "Ha! It ended up as cat food. I'd warned you son."

I turned to look up at Dharamsingh. He had a smile on his face, but I had tears in my eyes.


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